Wednesday, 15 October 2008

Treasure hunting

These porcino mushrooms we found in the woods (mainly lime trees and pine trees) in the area of my previous posting.

31 comments:

Virginia said...

If you are sure these are "OK" let's saute some up! Yummy I'm sure. How does your wife cook these??

Juana said...

You are so lucky for finding those mushroons, in my country we do not have it.
Bon Appétit !!

Tinchen said...

Wow! Wonderful mushrooms! Here we have not so many this year ...

Great!

Greetings from Germany,
Katrin

Baruch said...

Wow, that's quite a find! Looks great in the basket too

Rakesh Vanamali said...

Wow! They look yummy! I'm imagining some hot mushroom soup with pepper, butter and chicken!

Good picture

Rakesh
http://almostsunday.blogspot.com

evlahos said...

you did a great job

Blognote said...

Hi, Virginia!
I usually prepare these myself: after careful cleaning I slice them up and put them in a pan (without lid!) after having put two spoons of olive oil mixed with some butter (very little!).You will see that the mushrooms soon release their own moist. Then I add two pieces of garlic, while stirring (never with a metal spoon!), but take these out after a few minutes.
Then let the mushrooms "cook" in their own moist for about half an hour at a medium/high flame, stirring now and then. Before you take them out of the pan add some salt and some freshly cut parsely.
They are then ready to be added to your meat or chicken dish or you can blend them into your "risotto".

Should you prefer them as a sauce for your pasta ("Pappardelle" would be the best!) you should add some cream at the end and then add your pappardelle "al dente" into the pan, in order to bind it all together. Then sprinkle some fresh parmazan cheese over it! Bon appètit and I am sure that you know all the tricks in the kitchen better than I do!

Thank you for your comments, Juana! I can assure you that they are very tasty but one should not eat a lot of them, as hey are in general not very good for the liver!

Thanks for visiting, Tinchen!!
This season has not been a good season for Porcino mushrooms also here in Italy. Next year better!!

Thank you for visiting and for your kind comments, Baruch!!

Thank you, Evlahos!!

Also mushroom soup is excellent,Rakesh!! (I'm getting hungry...)Thanks for your comments!

LeenaM said...

Greetings from autumnal Finland, leaves have gone from trees and frost have been in one night. . . .a winter is here soon!
About Porcine - did you see my mushroom post of September :
http://leejattas.aminus3.com/image/2008-09-16.html

Good appetite to you!

Blognote said...

Yes, I just looked at your beautiful photos of the mushrooms, Leenam!! You should be so lucky o find them just outside your doorstep! The Italians, me included, like the "porcini" the best, so I am also sure that many are also imported from other countries where eating these specific mushrooms is perhaps not so much of a tradition as here.Thanks for your information and...un saluto da Arona!

Saretta said...

Oh, those look delicious! And they are a true sign of autumn!

Your EG Tour Guide said...

Very cool. I don't know enough about mushrooms to dare collect them. I admire people who do. ;-)

Abraham Lincoln said...

I love to eat mushrooms but I don't know what to look for. Some of what we have are poison and I would probably pick them to eat. Nice photography.

ken mac said...

how bout a followup pic of the mushrooms in their final state before eating?

Ming the Merciless said...

Oh, what a fun activity. I've heard so much wonderful things about the Italian tradition of hunting for truffles after a rainy season.

Porcini mushroom is so expensive here in NYC. But so tasty. Hope you enjoyed your mushroom.

Marie-Noyale said...

Lucky you!!
What a beautiful Basket
and your recipe is exactly the way I used to cook them...
Hope you enjoyed!

Jilly said...

These look SO good. And in yesterday's photograph - what a beautiful area to go mushrooming.

Blognote said...

Grazie, Saretta!!

Thank you too, Your Eg Tour Guide!!
I used to know little about mushrooms (and I still do), but I pick only these ones whch I can recognize.

Thank you for visiting, Abraham!!
I spotted many poisonous ones, which are devastating for the health if eaten. The Porcini are more easy to recognize, although there are some which look alike and cannot be eaten!

You would have to wait a while, Ken, because the ones we picked are frozen!! When I will prepare them again, I will take a picture, although I personally do not like taking photos of food on a plate but I will think of something!!

Thanks, Ming!! They are also expensive here when you have to buy them. That's also one of the reasons that we go out hunting which is also a good walking exercise in the open air.

Thank you, Marie!!

Thank you too, Jilly!!

tr3nta said...

OOOOOOoooooooooo!!!!!!....

Boletus Edulis... The BEST!!!

Dusty Lens said...

Wonderful find! Now to decide which wine to pair up with this meal

MumbaiiteAnu said...

That's a great lot of mushrooms. I love the way you prepare them. Yumm...

Blognote said...

With this meal I'd say a "Barolo" wine from Piedmont or an "Aglianico di Rionero in Vulture", Dusty Lens!!. These two splendid important Italian wines go perfectly well with roast meet and mushrooms. The latter one (from the Region Basilicata in sundrenched southern Italy)I discovered only recently and is of the same quality of the more famous "Brunello di Montalcino"

Tr3nta, you would of course drink an excellent red Spanish wine with these magnificent mushrooms.Which one would you recommend to me?

Blognote said...

Dusty Lens, you mentioned in my previous post of the "Light House" that you would pay 65 $ for a bottle of Barolo in the US. The prices there would surely contain - apart from handling costs, brokers, etc - import duties, state tax, federal tax and the lot.
I just saw the price range of the "Barolo" wines applied here in Italy, prices which vary between Euro 8.50 and Euro 3.100! Yes, threethousandandonehundred Euro per bottle! Quite a choice, right?
I am priviliged living quite near to the Barolo area, so I could buy them straight from the source at very reasonable prices, depending of course on the quality. The most expensive Barolo wines have of course been treated with special care and can last even 20 years in the bottle when they are ready to drink at their best!
I will stick to the more affordable wines. I'll drinl to your good health! Cheers!

Eki Akhwan said...

Hmmm ... I love mushrooms, they are yummy! ... How do you usually cook them?

Eki Akhwan said...

Sorry, I did not read your answer to Virginia's question ... The way you prepare it sounds simple and delicious ... (My mouth is watering now imagining it.) Thanks for sharing the recipe.

Sherry said...

That must be a fun activity.. looks good anyway. Recipes?
BTW, no snow down here, we only have snow in the mountains. I am just eager for snow NE so I can go to this beautiful place to snowshoe..I will see deer and bunny tracks in the early mornings, it takes my breathe away..I love it.
I love love snow. I was posting some for Ivar, he has drizzle and wants to see the sparkly white stuff too.

Blognote said...

Thanks for your visit, Eki!!

Thank you too, Sherry!! Recipes you can find above in answer to Virginia's quest!!
I wish you...snow!

PJ said...

Those look scrumptious. I also love your Sunday post, that was mythical.

jill said...

What a nice harvest. And a nice photo!

Ann said...

You've made me hungry. That recipe sounds wonderful (and easy).

エスタ said...

my mouth is watering too! ooh I love mushrooms, I shall try your method of preparing them. sadly i can only get dried porcini in japan, but lots and lots of shitake and maitake : )

Olivier said...

avec ça une bonne omelette ;o)

with it a good omelette ;o)